Somaliland: Erigavo, Borame, Las-Anod and Beletweine OCVP Conflict and Security Review

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OCVP  District security Review Nov 015  in Erigavo, Borame, LasAnod and Beltweine Districts

Somalilandsun – Dear All, The Observatory of Conflict and Violence Prevention is pleased to share with you the latest activities and achievements accomplished during the month of November , including publication of district-level conflict and security assessments for the districts of Erigavo, LasAnod, Beledweyne and Borama.

Summary

Erigavo: Key Findings from the 2015 DCSA Report

Overall, the findings from the assessment indicate that the district of Erigavo was regarded as being relatively peaceful, especially considering its heterogeneous clan composition and proximity to disputed areas such as the Sool region and Eastern Sanaag (Sanaag Barri). There was an established local council and formal structures in place for the provision of services to the community, including security and justice. However, the traditional leaders – community elders and religious leaders – remained integral to the community and were often consulted regarding matters of conflict or dispute resolution and justice in general. While there had been no reports of major conflict within the area during the year preceding the assessment, approximately one in ten respondents reported that they had witnessed incidences of conflict during this time. During the period leading up to the assessment, competition over resources was identified as the main reason for conflict within the area. The majority of respondents reported feeling fairly safe or very safe; however, a sizeable minority was less optimistic. Notably, the perception of safety appeared to be largely influenced by respondents’ location within the district, with clear variations in the perception of safety and how safety had evolved over the past year among respondents in the various subdivisions.

Las Anod: Key Findings from the 2015 DCSA Report

Although regarded as one of the most unstable regions in Somaliland, the findings from the 2015 Las Anod DSCA suggest that the district was relatively peaceful in recent times. There were few reported incidents of conflict or violence in the year leading up to the assessment despite the geopolitical instability resulting from various entities (Somaliland, Puntland and the Khatumo State) claiming territorial ownership. There was an established local council, which operated in accordance with the Regions and Districts Law of Somaliland, as well as formal structures in place for the provision of services to the community, including security and justice. However, while the formal institutions were generally well recognised, traditional (informal) entities – elders and religious leaders – remained integral within the society. Notably, the results from the assessment indicate that these informal entities were collectively more trusted than the police and the courts to address matters pertaining to security and justice respectively. In addition, although the majority of respondents perceived that there had been an improvement in the performance of the various local government institutions over the past year, reported levels of trust or confidence towards the Local Council and the police, in particular, were reported to be low. Nevertheless, in keeping with the reported experiences, there was a positive outlook regarding the level of safety in the community, with most respondents stating that they felt safe within the area.

Borama: Key Findings from the 2015 DCSA Report

Overall, the majority of respondents in the district of Borama indicated that they felt safe in the area. Most respondents were also of the opinion that safety had improved over the past year. There were, however, accounts of conflicts and incidents of crime and violence that had been witnessed during this time. Competition over resources, clashes among the youth, and family disputes were identified as the leading causes of conflict and violence in the area. Borama had a local council and formal systems of justice and security in place. However, while the majority expressed trust or confidence in these institutions, a sizeable minority also stated the opposite. Traditional entities, primarily elders and religious leaders, were highly regarded and influenced perception towards these state institutions. Generally, most respondents declared that it was important to have elected representatives although several arguments were presented in favour of the nomination system, which was previously utilised. Criticisms were also levelled against the police and the formal justice system. Nonetheless, the police was identified as the leading choice for responding to crime and violence whereas the formal justice system and elders were jointly regarded as the most trusted entity for dealing with matters pertaining to justice.

Research Publications:
As part of the on-going ‘District Conflict and Security Assessments’ (DCSAs) undertaken by the OCVP in all Somali regions, the following district-level assessments were published during the month of November:

  • Erigavo(Somaliland) District Conflict and Security Assessment: the full report can be accessed here, while its Somali version can be downloaded from here. The summary of the major research findings from Erigavo report can be accessed by clicking here and it’s Comparative Report from here
  • .LasAnod(Somaliland) District Conflict and Security Assessment: the full report can be downloaded here, while its Somali version can be downloaded here. The summary of the major research findings from the LasAnod district can be accessed by clicking here. Whereas the LasAnod Comparative Report can be downloaded here.
  • Borama(Somaliland) District Conflict and Security Assessment: the full report can be downloaded by clicking here, while the Summary Sheet that summarizes the major findings from Borama report can be accessed by clicking here.
  • Beledweyne(South Central) District Conflict and Security Assessment: click here to download the full report, the Summary Sheet that summarizes the major findings from the report can be also accessed here.

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